Chartered company - meaning and definition. What is Chartered company
Diclib.com
Online Dictionary

What (who) is Chartered company - definition


Chartered company         
A chartered company is an association with investors or shareholders that is incorporated and granted rights (often exclusive rights) by royal charter (or similar instrument of government) for the purpose of trade, exploration, and/or colonization.
Worshipful Company of Chartered Surveyors         
LIVERY COMPANY OF THE CITY OF LONDON
Chartered Surveyors' Company
The Worshipful Company of Chartered Surveyors is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. The organisation was granted Letters Patent in May 1977.
North Borneo Chartered Company         
  • Motto and logo of the company.
  • Area acquired by the company.
  • Board of directors of the company.
  • The company administration building in [[Sandakan]].
CHARTERED COMPANY
British North Borneo Company; British North Borneo Chartered Company; North Borneo Company
The North Borneo Chartered Company (NBCC), also known as the British North Borneo Company (BNBC) was a British chartered company formed on 1 November 1881 to administer and exploit the resources of North Borneo (present-day Sabah in Malaysia). The territory became a protectorate of the British Empire in 1888 but the company remained involved with the territory until 1946, when administration was fully assumed by the Crown colony government.
Examples of use of Chartered company
1. While private insurers generally plan for a severe "once in 100 years" storm, the state–chartered company bases its premiums on a lesser "once in 35 years" storm.
2. Organized by then–Freddie Mac chief lobbyist Mitchell Delk, the effort pumped money into the campaigns of more than 50 politicians who had direct oversight of the government–chartered company or were considered supportive of it.
3. The disclosure was contained in a 1'0–page report the government–chartered company released as it returned to timely financial reporting five years after an accounting scandal exposed pervasive problems in the systems it uses to track its results.