Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion - meaning and definition. What is Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion
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What (who) is Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion - definition


Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion         
Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion (CADD) is a tool that evaluates the deleteriousness of single nucleotide, insertion and deletion variants in the human genome. In contrast with other annotation tools that are restricted in scope, the CADD framework integrates multiple annotations into one metric.
ozone hole         
  • NASA projections of stratospheric ozone concentrations if chlorofluorocarbons had not been banned
  • TOMS]] each year in the ozone hole
  • link=
  • DU/km]]) and blocking of different bands of ultraviolet radiation: In essence, all UVC is blocked by diatomic oxygen (100–200 nm) or by ozone (triatomic oxygen) (200–280 nm) in the atmosphere. The ozone layer then blocks most UVB. Meanwhile, UVA is hardly affected by ozone, and most of it reaches the ground. UVA makes up almost all UV light that penetrates the Earth's atmosphere.
  • The ozone cycle
  • Ozone levels stabilized in the 1990s following the Montreal Protocol, and have started to recover. They are projected to reach pre-1980 levels before 2075.<ref name=nasa-recovery-projection/>
  • [[Radiative forcing]] from various greenhouse gases and other sources
  • right
  • Global monthly average total ozone amount
  • Ozone-depleting gas trends
  • access-date=April 16, 2011}}</ref>
STRATOSPHERIC PHENOMENA OF EARTH
Ozone hole; Ozone Depletion; Ozone depletion theory; Ozone Hole; Ozone depleter; Discovery of ozone depletion; Ozone depleting substance; Ozone-depleting substance; Depletion of the ozone layer; Depletion of ozone; Rowland-Molina reaction; Ozone layer depletion; Ozone depleting; Ozone depleting chemical; The depletion of the ozone layer; Ozone depletors; Ozone Depleting Substance; Reduction of stratospheric ozone; Ozone depletion research; Ozone damage; Ozone-depleting chemical; Antarctic ozone hole; Ozone Layer Depletion; Hole in the ozone layer; Hole in the ozone; Common misconceptions about ozone depletion; Ozone destruction; Ozone Depleting Substances
¦ noun a region of marked thinning of the ozone layer in high latitudes, chiefly in winter, due to CFCs and other atmospheric pollutants.
Ozone depletion         
  • NASA projections of stratospheric ozone concentrations if chlorofluorocarbons had not been banned
  • TOMS]] each year in the ozone hole
  • link=
  • DU/km]]) and blocking of different bands of ultraviolet radiation: In essence, all UVC is blocked by diatomic oxygen (100–200&nbsp;nm) or by ozone (triatomic oxygen) (200–280&nbsp;nm) in the atmosphere. The ozone layer then blocks most UVB. Meanwhile, UVA is hardly affected by ozone, and most of it reaches the ground. UVA makes up almost all UV light that penetrates the Earth's atmosphere.
  • The ozone cycle
  • Ozone levels stabilized in the 1990s following the Montreal Protocol, and have started to recover. They are projected to reach pre-1980 levels before 2075.<ref name=nasa-recovery-projection/>
  • [[Radiative forcing]] from various greenhouse gases and other sources
  • right
  • Global monthly average total ozone amount
  • Ozone-depleting gas trends
  • access-date=April 16, 2011}}</ref>
STRATOSPHERIC PHENOMENA OF EARTH
Ozone hole; Ozone Depletion; Ozone depletion theory; Ozone Hole; Ozone depleter; Discovery of ozone depletion; Ozone depleting substance; Ozone-depleting substance; Depletion of the ozone layer; Depletion of ozone; Rowland-Molina reaction; Ozone layer depletion; Ozone depleting; Ozone depleting chemical; The depletion of the ozone layer; Ozone depletors; Ozone Depleting Substance; Reduction of stratospheric ozone; Ozone depletion research; Ozone damage; Ozone-depleting chemical; Antarctic ozone hole; Ozone Layer Depletion; Hole in the ozone layer; Hole in the ozone; Common misconceptions about ozone depletion; Ozone destruction; Ozone Depleting Substances
Ozone depletion consists of two related events observed since the late 1970s: a steady lowering of about four percent in the total amount of ozone in Earth's atmosphere, and a much larger springtime decrease in stratospheric ozone (the ozone layer) around Earth's polar regions. The latter phenomenon is referred to as the ozone hole.