Dielectric loss - meaning and definition. What is Dielectric loss
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What (who) is Dielectric loss - definition


Dielectric loss         
MEASURE OF A DIELECTRIC MATERIAL'S INHERENT DISSIPATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC ENERGY
Loss Tangent; Dielectric losses; Loss tangent; Loss angle; Dielectric dissipation
Dielectric loss quantifies a dielectric material's inherent dissipation of electromagnetic energy (e.g.
Dielectric         
  • A polarised dielectric material
ELECTRICALLY POORLY CONDUCTING OR NON-CONDUCTING, NON-METALLIC SUBSTANCE OF WHICH CHARGE CARRIERS ARE GENERALLY NOT FREE TO MOVE
Dielectric level; Paraelectricity; Dielectric dispersion; Dipolar polarization; Ionic polarization; Dielectric media; Dielectric medium; Dielectric relaxation; Debye relaxation; Debye equation; Dielectrics; Dialectric; Dielectric materials; Relaxation time of electrons; Dielectric relaxation as a chemical rate process; Dielectric relaxation asa chemical rate process; Paraelectric; Dielectric polarization; Dielectric properties; Dielectric response; Perfect dielectric; Dielectric material; Paraelectrics; Ionic polarisation
·noun Any substance or medium that transmits the electric force by a process different from conduction, as in the phenomena of induction; a nonconductor. separating a body electrified by induction, from the electrifying body.
Dielectric Polarization         
  • A polarised dielectric material
ELECTRICALLY POORLY CONDUCTING OR NON-CONDUCTING, NON-METALLIC SUBSTANCE OF WHICH CHARGE CARRIERS ARE GENERALLY NOT FREE TO MOVE
Dielectric level; Paraelectricity; Dielectric dispersion; Dipolar polarization; Ionic polarization; Dielectric media; Dielectric medium; Dielectric relaxation; Debye relaxation; Debye equation; Dielectrics; Dialectric; Dielectric materials; Relaxation time of electrons; Dielectric relaxation as a chemical rate process; Dielectric relaxation asa chemical rate process; Paraelectric; Dielectric polarization; Dielectric properties; Dielectric response; Perfect dielectric; Dielectric material; Paraelectrics; Ionic polarisation
A term due to Faraday. It expresses what he conceived to be the condition of a dielectric when its opposite faces are oppositely electrified. The molecules are supposed to be arranged by the electrification in a series of polar chains, possibly being originally in themselves seats of opposite polarities, or having such imparted to them by the electricities. The action is analogous to that of a magnet pole on a mass of soft iron, or on a pile of iron filings.