Greek Braille - meaning and definition. What is Greek Braille
Diclib.com
Online Dictionary

What (who) is Greek Braille - definition


Greek Braille         
  • A sample of [[Moon type]] in various languages including Greek.
BRAILLE ALPHABET OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE
Greek braille; International Greek Braille
Greek Braille is the braille alphabet of the Greek language. It is based on international braille conventions, generally corresponding to Latin transliteration.
braille         
  • Silver wedding bands with names ''Henri(que)'' and ''Tita'' written in braille
  • Braille typewriter
  • An embossed map of a German train station, with braille text
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • ' (apostrophe)
  • * (asterisk)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • UPPERCASE (capital)
  • : (colon)
  • , (comma)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • . (decimal point)
  • 40px
  • ! (exclamation point)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • - (hyphen)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • # (number)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • . (period)
  • 40px
  • ? (question mark)
  • ” (quote close)
  • “ (quote open)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • ; (semicolon)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • Braille typewriter
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • Braille book and the same book in inkprint
  • Braille on a box of tablets. The raised Braille reads "plavix".
  • A bottle of [[Chapoutier]] wine, with braille on the label
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • French]] for "first", can be read
  • The final form of Braille's alphabet, according to Henri (1952). "(1)" indicates markers for musical and mathematical notation.
  • Georgia Academy for the Blind has been providing braille education and braille literacy since 1876.
  • Lucy Sergent, 26-year-old daughter of a Kentucky coal miner, writing with a slate and stylus in 1946. Blind from birth, she attended the [[Kentucky School for the Blind]] for 11 years.
  • Stainsby Braille writer
  • Braille plate at ''[[Duftrosengarten]]'' in [[Rapperswil]], Switzerland
WRITING SYSTEM FOR BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED PEOPLE BASED ON A NOTATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE TRANSCRIPTION OF OTHER SCRIPTS
Braille book; Braille System; Braile; Braille code; Braille cell; ISO 15924:Brai; Braille alphabet; Braille contraction; Braille Keyboard; Braille keyboard; Braille writer; Braille typewriter; Brai (script); Braille (script); Eight-point braille; Eight-dot braille; Braille script; Braille system; Brai
<human language> /breyl/ (Often capitalised) A class of writing systems, intended for use by blind and low-vision users, which express glyphs as raised dots. Currently employed braille standards use eight dots per cell, where a cell is a glyph-space two dots across by four dots high; most glyphs use only the top six dots. Braille was developed by Louis Braille (pronounced /looy bray/) in France in the 1820s. Braille systems for most languages can be fairly trivially converted to and from the usual script. Braille has several totally coincidental parallels with digital computing: it is binary, it is based on groups of eight bits/dots and its development began in the 1820s, at the same time Charles Babbage proposed the Difference Engine. Computers output Braille on braille displays and {braille printers} for hard copy. {British Royal National Institute for the Blind (http://rnib.org.uk/wesupply/fctsheet/braille.htm)}. (1998-10-19)
Braille         
  • Silver wedding bands with names ''Henri(que)'' and ''Tita'' written in braille
  • Braille typewriter
  • An embossed map of a German train station, with braille text
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • ' (apostrophe)
  • * (asterisk)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • UPPERCASE (capital)
  • : (colon)
  • , (comma)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • . (decimal point)
  • 40px
  • ! (exclamation point)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • - (hyphen)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • # (number)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • . (period)
  • 40px
  • ? (question mark)
  • ” (quote close)
  • “ (quote open)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • ; (semicolon)
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • Braille typewriter
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • Braille book and the same book in inkprint
  • Braille on a box of tablets. The raised Braille reads "plavix".
  • A bottle of [[Chapoutier]] wine, with braille on the label
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • 40px
  • French]] for "first", can be read
  • The final form of Braille's alphabet, according to Henri (1952). "(1)" indicates markers for musical and mathematical notation.
  • Georgia Academy for the Blind has been providing braille education and braille literacy since 1876.
  • Lucy Sergent, 26-year-old daughter of a Kentucky coal miner, writing with a slate and stylus in 1946. Blind from birth, she attended the [[Kentucky School for the Blind]] for 11 years.
  • Stainsby Braille writer
  • Braille plate at ''[[Duftrosengarten]]'' in [[Rapperswil]], Switzerland
WRITING SYSTEM FOR BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED PEOPLE BASED ON A NOTATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE TRANSCRIPTION OF OTHER SCRIPTS
Braille book; Braille System; Braile; Braille code; Braille cell; ISO 15924:Brai; Braille alphabet; Braille contraction; Braille Keyboard; Braille keyboard; Braille writer; Braille typewriter; Brai (script); Braille (script); Eight-point braille; Eight-dot braille; Braille script; Braille system; Brai

Braille (Pronounced: BRAYL) is a tactile writing system used by people who are visually impaired, including people who are blind, deafblind or who have low vision. It can be read either on embossed paper or by using refreshable braille displays that connect to computers and smartphone devices. Braille can be written using a slate and stylus, a braille writer, an electronic braille notetaker or with the use of a computer connected to a braille embosser.

Braille is named after its creator, Louis Braille, a Frenchman who lost his sight as a result of a childhood accident. In 1824, at the age of fifteen, he developed the braille code based on the French alphabet as an improvement on night writing. He published his system, which subsequently included musical notation, in 1829. The second revision, published in 1837, was the first binary form of writing developed in the modern era.

Braille characters are formed using a combination of six raised dots arranged in a 3 × 2 matrix, called the braille cell. The number and arrangement of these dots distinguishes one character from another. Since the various braille alphabets originated as transcription codes for printed writing, the mappings (sets of character designations) vary from language to language, and even within one; in English Braille there are 3 levels of braille: uncontracted braille – a letter-by-letter transcription used for basic literacy; contracted braille – an addition of abbreviations and contractions used as a space-saving mechanism; and grade 3 – various non-standardized personal stenography that is less commonly used.

In addition to braille text (letters, punctuation, contractions), it is also possible to create embossed illustrations and graphs, with the lines either solid or made of series of dots, arrows, and bullets that are larger than braille dots. A full braille cell includes six raised dots arranged in two columns, each column having three dots. The dot positions are identified by numbers from one to six. There are 64 possible combinations, including no dots at all for a word space. Dot configurations can be used to represent a letter, digit, punctuation mark, or even a word.

Early braille education is crucial to literacy, education and employment among the blind. Despite the evolution of new technologies, including screen reader software that reads information aloud, braille provides blind people with access to spelling, punctuation and other aspects of written language less accessible through audio alone. While some have suggested that audio-based technologies will decrease the need for braille, technological advancements such as braille displays have continued to make braille more accessible and available. Braille users highlight that braille remains as essential as print is to the sighted.

Examples of use of Greek Braille
1. Braille medicine The National Pharmaceutical Organization (EOF) yesterday sent a circular to all drug companies in Greece informing them that in a year‘s time all medicines sold here will need to have certain details written in Greek Braille on the packaging.