Proof by exhaustion - meaning and definition. What is Proof by exhaustion
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What (who) is Proof by exhaustion - definition


Proof by exhaustion         
PROOF BY EXAMINING ALL INDIVIDUAL CASES
Proof-by-exhaustion; Proof by cases; Separation of Cases; Separation of cases; Brute force method; Perfect induction; Proof by Exhaustion; Case splitting; Exhaustive proof
Proof by exhaustion, also known as proof by cases, proof by case analysis, complete induction or the brute force method, is a method of mathematical proof in which the statement to be proved is split into a finite number of cases or sets of equivalent cases, and where each type of case is checked to see if the proposition in question holds.. This is a method of direct proof.
Proof by intimidation         
METHOD OF CONVINCING SOMEONE BY USING JARGON OR CLAIMING IT AS CLEAR
Proof by verbosity; Argumentum verbosium; Proof by Intimidation; Argument by verbosity; Left as an exercise for the reader; The proof is left to the reader
Proof by intimidation (or argumentum verbosum) is a jocular phrase used mainly in mathematics to refer to a specific form of hand-waving, whereby one attempts to advance an argument by marking it as obvious or trivial, or by giving an argument loaded with jargon and obscure results. It attempts to intimidate the audience into simply accepting the result without evidence, by appealing to their ignorance and lack of understanding.
Exhaustion of intellectual property rights         
GENERAL LEGAL DOCTRINE THAT LIMITS INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN A PRODUCT ONCE SOLD
Doctrine of international exhaustion; Exhaustion of rights; Doctrine of exhaustion; Patent exhaustion; First-sale doctrine (patent); Patent exhaustion doctrine; Exhaustion of copyright; Exhaustion Doctrine; Doctrine of Exhaustion; Exhaustion doctrine; International exhaustion
The exhaustion of intellectual property rights constitutes one of the limits of intellectual property (IP) rights. Once a given product has been sold under the authorization of the IP owner, the reselling, rental, lending and other third party commercial uses of IP-protected goods in domestic and international markets is governed by the principle.