Proper transfer function - meaning and definition. What is Proper transfer function
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What (who) is Proper transfer function - definition


Proper transfer function         
TRANSFER FUNCTION IN WHICH THE DEGREE OF THE NUMERATOR DOES NOT EXCEED THE DEGREE OF THE DENOMINATOR
Strictly proper; Proper (control theory)
In control theory, a proper transfer function is a transfer function in which the degree of the numerator does not exceed the degree of the denominator. A strictly proper transfer function is a transfer function where the degree of the numerator is less than the degree of the denominator.
Optical transfer function         
  • The three-dimensional point spread functions (a,c) and corresponding modulation transfer functions (b,d) of a wide-field microscope (a,b) and confocal microscope (c,d). In both cases the numerical aperture of the objective is 1.49 and the refractive index of the medium 1.52. The wavelength of the emitted light is assumed to be 600 nm and, in case of the confocal microscope, that of the excitation light 500 nm with circular polarization. A section is cut to visualize the internal intensity distribution. The colors as shown on the logarithmic color scale indicate the irradiance (a,c) and spectral density (b,d) normalized to the maximum value.
  • Various closely related characterizations of an optical system exhibiting coma, a typical aberration that occurs off-axis. (a) The point-spread function (PSF) is the image of a point source. (b) The image of a line is referred to as the line-spread function, in this case a vertical line. The line-spread function is directly proportional to the vertical integration of the point-spread image. The optical-transfer function (OTF) is defined as the Fourier transform of the point-spread function and is thus generally a two-dimensional complex function. Typically only a one-dimensional slice is shown (c), corresponding to the Fourier transform of the line-spread function. The thick green line indicates the real part of the function, and the thin red line the imaginary part. Often only the absolute value of the complex function is shown, this allows visualization of the two-dimensional function (d); however, more commonly only the one-dimensional function is shown (e). The latter is typically normalized at the spatial frequency zero and referred to as the modulation transfer function (MTF). For completeness, the complex argument is sometimes provided as the phase transfer function (PhTF), shown in panel (f).
  • The '''MTF''' data versus spatial frequency is normalized by fitting a sixth order polynomial to it, making a smooth curve. The 50% cut-off frequency is determined and the corresponding '''spatial frequency''' is found, yielding the approximate position of '''best focus'''.
  • date=August 2013}} of the total frame area of a '''knife-edge test target''' back-illuminated by a '''black body'''. The area is defined to encompass the edge of the target image.
  • When viewed through an optical system with trefoil aberration, the image of a point object will look as a three-pointed star (a). As the point-spread function is not rotational symmetric, only a two-dimensional optical transfer function can describe it well (b). The height of the surface plot indicates the absolute value and the hue indicates the complex argument of the function. A spoke target imaged by such an imaging device is shown by the simulation in (c).
FUNCTION THAT SPECIFIES HOW DIFFERENT SPATIAL FREQUENCIES ARE HANDLED BY THE SYSTEM; DESCRIBES HOW THE OPTICS PROJECT LIGHT FROM THE OBJECT OR SCENE ONTO A PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM, DETECTOR ARRAY, RETINA, SCREEN, ETC.
Modulation Transfer Function; Modulation transfer function; Phase Transfer Function; Optical Transfer Function; Modulation transfer function (infrared imaging); MTF chart; Phase transfer function; Line spread function
The optical transfer function (OTF) of an optical system such as a camera, microscope, human eye, or projector specifies how different spatial frequencies are handled by the system. It is used by optical engineers to describe how the optics project light from the object or scene onto a photographic film, detector array, retina, screen, or simply the next item in the optical transmission chain.
Transfer function         
FUNCTION SPECIFYING THE BEHAVIOR OF A COMPONENT IN AN ELECTRONIC OR CONTROL SYSTEM
Transfer-function; Transfer Function; Natural response; Pulse-transfer function; Network function; Transfer curve; Transfer characteristic; System function
In engineering, a transfer function (also known as system functionBernd Girod, Rudolf Rabenstein, Alexander Stenger, Signals and systems, 2nd ed., Wiley, 2001, p.