equitable estoppel - meaning and definition. What is equitable estoppel
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What (who) is equitable estoppel - definition

JUDICIAL DEVICE IN COMMON LAW WHERE A COURT MAY PREVENT A PERSON FROM MAKING ASSERTIONS
Promissory estoppel; Equitable estoppel; Detrimental reliance; Promissory Estoppel; Estop; Estoppal; Estopple; Estopped; Issue estoppel; Estoppel by convention; Estoppel by agreement; Reasonable reliance; Entrapment by estoppel

equitable estoppel         
n. where a court will not grant a judgment or other legal relief to a party who has not acted fairly; for example, by having made false representations or concealing material facts from the other party. This illustrates the legal maxim: "he who seeks equity, must do equity." Example: Larry Landlord rents space to Dora Dressmaker in his shopping center but falsely tells her a Sears store will be a tenant and will draw customers to the project. He does not tell her a new freeway is going to divert traffic from the center. When she fails to pay her rent due to lack of business, Landlord sues her for breach of lease. Dressmaker may claim he is equitably estopped. See also: clean hands doctrine estoppel
estoppel         
n.
Bar, impediment.
reasonable reliance         
n. particularly in contracts, what a prudent person would believe and act upon if told something by another. Typically, a person is promised a profit or other benefit, and in reliance takes steps in reliance on the promise, only to find the statements or promises were not true or were exaggerated. The one who relied can recover damages for the costs of his/her actions or demand performance if the reliance was "reasonable." If the promisor says he "owned the Brooklyn Bridge," reliance on that statement is not reasonable. In a complaint the language would read something like: "in reasonable reliance on defendant's statement (or promise), plaintiff did the following:." See also: contract

Wikipedia

Estoppel

Estoppel is a judicial device in common law legal systems whereby a court may prevent or "estop" a person from making assertions or from going back on his or her word; the person being sanctioned is "estopped". Estoppel may prevent someone from bringing a particular claim. Legal doctrines of estoppel are based in both common law and equity. It is also a concept in international law.