Afrodite - translation to English
Diclib.com
Online Dictionary

Afrodite - translation to English

GREEK GODDESS OF LOVE, BEAUTY, PLEASURE, AND PROCREATION
Aphrodite Acidalia; Aphroditê; Kythereia; Cypris; Afrodite; Greek goddess of love; Aphordite; Aphrodite Paphia; Ἀφροδίτη; Aphrodisias (goddess); Aphroditean; Aphroditic; Lady of Cyprus; Aphrodite (mythology); Afroditi
  • page=194}}
  • Greek relief from Aphrodisias, depicting a Roman-influenced Aphrodite sitting on a throne holding an infant while the shepherd [[Anchises]] stands beside her.
  • ''The Aphrodite of Fréjus'']] statue on display. Aphrodite holds in her left hand an apple
  • Greek]]"), Aphrodite's legendary birthplace in [[Paphos]], Cyprus
  • Attic]] pottery vessel in the shape of Aphrodite inside a shell from the [[Phanagoria]] cemetery in the [[Taman Peninsula]]
  • Illustration by Édouard Zier for [[Pierre Louÿs]]'s 1896 erotic novel ''[[Aphrodite: mœurs antiques]]''
  • pages=[https://archive.org/stream/bub_gb_2vxGAgAAQBAJ#page/n115/mode/1up 114–115]}}</ref>
  • pages=98–103}}
  • Ancient Greek mosaic from [[Antioch]] dating to the second century AD, depicting the [[Judgement of Paris]]
  • The statuette portrays Aphrodite on the point of untying the laces of the sandal on her left foot, under which a small Eros squats, touching the sole of her shoe with his right hand. The Goddess is leaning with her left arm (the hand is missing) against a figure of Priapus standing, naked and bearded, positioned on a small cylindrical altar while, next to her left thigh, there is a tree trunk over which the garment of the Goddess is folded. Aphrodite, almost completely naked, wears only a sort of costume, consisting of a corset held up by two pairs of straps and two short sleeves on the upper part of her arm, from which a long chain leads to her hips and forms a star-shaped motif at the level of her navel. The 'bikini', for which the statuette is famous, is obtained by the masterly use of the technique of gilding, also employed on her groin, in the pendant necklace and in the armilla on Aphrodite's right wrist, as well as on Priapus' phallus. Traces of the red paint are evident on the tree trunk, on the short curly hair gathered back in a bun and on the lips of the Goddess, as well as on the heads of Priapus and the Eros. Aphrodite's eyes are made of glass paste, while the presence of holes at the level of the ear-lobes suggest the existence of precious metal ear-rings which have since been lost. An interesting insight into the female ornaments of Roman times, the statuette, probably imported from the area of Alexandria, reproduces with a few modifications the statuary type of Aphrodite untying her sandal, known from copies in bronze and terracotta.}}

For extensive research and a bibliography on the subject, see: de Franciscis 1963, p. 78, tav. XCI; Kraus 1973, nn. 270–71, pp. 194–95; Pompei 1973, n. 132; Pompeji 1973, n. 199, pp. 142 e 144; Pompeji 1974, n. 281, pp. 148–49; Pompeii A.D. 79 1976, p. 83 e n. 218; Pompeii A.D. 79 1978, I, n. 208, pp. 64–65, II, n. 208, p. 189; Döhl, Zanker 1979, p. 202, tav. Va; Pompeii A.D. 79 1980, p. 79 e n. 198; Pompeya 1981, n. 198, p. 107; Pompeii lives 1984, fig. 10, p. 46; Collezioni Museo 1989, I, 2, n. 254, pp. 146–47; PPM II, 1990, n. 7, p. 532; Armitt 1993, p. 240; Vésuve 1995, n. 53, pp. 162–63; Vulkan 1995, n. 53, pp. 162–63; LIMC VIII, 1, 1997, p. 210, s.v. Venus, n. 182; LIMC VIII, 2, 1997, p. 144; LIMC VIII, 1, 1997, p. 1031, s.v. Priapos, n. 15; LIMC VIII, 2, 1997, p. 680; Romana Pictura 1998, n. 153, p. 317 e tav. a p. 245; Cantarella 1999, p. 128; De Caro 1999, pp. 100–01; De Caro 2000, p. 46 e tav. a p. 62; Pompeii 2000, n. 1, p. 62.}}
  • manuscript illumination]] of Venus, sitting on a rainbow, with her devotees offering her their hearts
  • First-century AD Roman fresco of Mars and Venus from [[Pompeii]]
  • Galatea]]'' (1717) by [[Jean Raoux]], showing Aphrodite bringing the statue to life
  • temple of Aphrodite]] at [[Aphrodisias]]
  • ''Venus and Anchises'' (1889 or 1890) by [[William Blake Richmond]]

Afrodite         
Aphrodite, goddess of beauty and love (Greek Mythology)
Aeneas      
n. zoon van Anchises en Afrodite en de held van Virgils "Aeneid"
Aphrodite      
n. Afrodite (godin v.d. schoonheid en liefde in de Griekse mythologie)

Definition

Aphrodite
·noun A beautiful butterfly (Argunnis Aphrodite) of the United States.
II. Aphrodite ·noun The Greek goddess of love, corresponding to the Venus of the Romans.
III. Aphrodite ·noun A large marine annelid, covered with long, lustrous, golden, hairlike setae; the sea mouse.

Wikipedia

Aphrodite

Aphrodite ( (listen) AF-rə-DY-tee; Greek: Ἀφροδίτη, translit. Aphrodítē; Attic Greek pronunciation: [a.pʰro.dǐː.tɛː], Koine Greek: [a.ɸroˈdi.te̝], Modern Greek: [a.froˈði.ti]) is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, lust, beauty, pleasure, passion, procreation, and as her syncretized Roman goddess counterpart Venus, desire, sex, fertility, prosperity, and victory. Aphrodite's major symbols include seashells, myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans. The cult of Aphrodite was largely derived from that of the Phoenician goddess Astarte, a cognate of the East Semitic goddess Ishtar, whose cult was based on the Sumerian cult of Inanna. Aphrodite's main cult centers were Cythera, Cyprus, Corinth, and Athens. Her main festival was the Aphrodisia, which was celebrated annually in midsummer. In Laconia, Aphrodite was worshipped as a warrior goddess. She was also the patron goddess of prostitutes, an association which led early scholars to propose the concept of "sacred prostitution" in Greco-Roman culture, an idea which is now generally seen as erroneous.

In Hesiod's Theogony, Aphrodite is born off the coast of Cythera from the foam (ἀφρός, aphrós) produced by Uranus's genitals, which his son Cronus had severed and thrown into the sea. In Homer's Iliad, however, she is the daughter of Zeus and Dione. Plato, in his Symposium, asserts that these two origins actually belong to separate entities: Aphrodite Ourania (a transcendent, "Heavenly" Aphrodite) and Aphrodite Pandemos (Aphrodite common to "all the people"). Aphrodite had many other epithets, each emphasizing a different aspect of the same goddess, or used by a different local cult. Thus she was also known as Cytherea (Lady of Cythera) and Cypris (Lady of Cyprus), because both locations claimed to be the place of her birth.

In Greek mythology, Aphrodite was married to Hephaestus, the god of fire, blacksmiths and metalworking. Aphrodite was frequently unfaithful to him and had many lovers; in the Odyssey, she is caught in the act of adultery with Ares, the god of war. In the First Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite, she seduces the mortal shepherd Anchises. Aphrodite was also the surrogate mother and lover of the mortal shepherd Adonis, who was killed by a wild boar. Along with Athena and Hera, Aphrodite was one of the three goddesses whose feud resulted in the beginning of the Trojan War and she plays a major role throughout the Iliad. Aphrodite has been featured in Western art as a symbol of female beauty and has appeared in numerous works of Western literature. She is a major deity in modern Neopagan religions, including the Church of Aphrodite, Wicca, and Hellenismos.