Jan Vermeer - translation to german
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Jan Vermeer - translation to german

DUTCH PAINTER (1632–1675)
Jan Vermeer; Vermeer; Jan van der Meer van Delft; Jan van Der Meer; Jan Vermeer van Delft; Jan van der Meer; Jan van der meer; Catherina Bolnes; Johannes Vermeer van Delft; Johannes (Jan) Vermeer; Johannes "Jan" Vermeer; Johan Vermeer
  • Replica of the St. Luke Guildhouse on Voldersgracht in Delft
  • Delft in 1649, by cartographer [[Willem Blaeu]]
  • ''A View of Delft after the Explosion of 1654'', by [[Egbert van der Poel]]
  • ''The Jesuit Church on the Oude Langendijk in Delft'', circa 1730, brush in gray ink, by [[Abraham Rademaker]], coll. Stadsarchief Delft
  • ''[[The Little Street]]'' (1657–58)
  • The Milkmaid]]'' (c. 1658), [[Rijksmuseum]] in Amsterdam
  • Memorial (2007) of Johannes Vermeer in Oude Kerk. Delft, Netherlands
  • [[Théophile Thoré-Bürger]]
  • date=2002}}</ref>

Jan Vermeer         
Jan Vermeer
Jan Gossaert         
  • ''[[Jean Carondelet]]''
  • The Holy Family, about 1507–1508
  • The Adoration of the Kings]]'', formerly at [[Castle Howard]], now at the [[National Gallery]]
  • Portrait of Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda
  • Jan Gossaert-self portrait (1515–1520). Collection of the [[Currier Museum of Art]], Manchester, New Hampshire
  • Three children of [[Christian II]] of Denmark 1526
FLEMISH PAINTER (1478–1532)
Jan de Mabuse; Jan Mabusa; Jan De Mabuse; Gossaert; Jan Mabuse; Jan Gossart
n. Jan Gossaert, Jan de Mabuse (ca. 1475-1533), flämischer Maler
Jan Mabuse         
  • ''[[Jean Carondelet]]''
  • The Holy Family, about 1507–1508
  • The Adoration of the Kings]]'', formerly at [[Castle Howard]], now at the [[National Gallery]]
  • Portrait of Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda
  • Jan Gossaert-self portrait (1515–1520). Collection of the [[Currier Museum of Art]], Manchester, New Hampshire
  • Three children of [[Christian II]] of Denmark 1526
FLEMISH PAINTER (1478–1532)
Jan de Mabuse; Jan Mabusa; Jan De Mabuse; Gossaert; Jan Mabuse; Jan Gossart
n. Jan Mabuse, Jan de Mabuse (ca. 1475-1533), flämischer Maler

Definition

Jan
·noun One of intermediate order between angels and men.

Wikipedia

Johannes Vermeer

Johannes Vermeer ( vər-MEER, vər-MAIR, Dutch: [vərˈmeːr], see below; also known as Jan Vermeer; October 1632 – 15 December 1675) was a Dutch Baroque Period painter who specialized in domestic interior scenes of middle-class life. During his lifetime, he was a moderately successful provincial genre painter, recognized in Delft and The Hague. Nonetheless, he produced relatively few paintings and evidently was not wealthy, leaving his wife and children in debt at his death.

Vermeer worked slowly and with great care, and frequently used very expensive pigments. He is particularly renowned for his masterly treatment and use of light in his work.

"Almost all his paintings", Hans Koningsberger wrote, "are apparently set in two smallish rooms in his house in Delft; they show the same furniture and decorations in various arrangements and they often portray the same people, mostly women."

His modest celebrity gave way to obscurity after his death. He was barely mentioned in Arnold Houbraken's major source book on 17th-century Dutch painting (Grand Theatre of Dutch Painters and Women Artists) and was thus omitted from subsequent surveys of Dutch art for nearly two centuries. In the 19th century, Vermeer was rediscovered by Gustav Friedrich Waagen and Théophile Thoré-Bürger, who published an essay attributing 66 pictures to him, although only 34 paintings are universally attributed to him today. Since that time, Vermeer's reputation has grown, and he is now acknowledged as one of the greatest painters of the Dutch Golden Age.

Similar to other major Dutch Golden Age artists such as Frans Hals and Rembrandt, Vermeer never went abroad. Also, like Rembrandt, he was an avid art collector and dealer.

Examples of use of Jan Vermeer
1. Das Gemälde "Briefeschreiberin in Gelb" des holländischen Barock–Malers Jan Vermeer wurde auf Plakaten in "E–Mail 1665" umgetauft, die "Junge Frau am Frisiertisch" von Gerrit Dou wurde zum "Fashion Victim" erklärt.