biharmonic projection - перевод на русский
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biharmonic projection - перевод на русский

MAP PROJECTION
Mollweide map projection; Mollweide Projection; Mollewide projection; Mollwide projection; Molwide projection; Homalographic projection; Babinet projection; Mollweide equal area projection; Elliptical projection; Homolographic projection; Molewide projection; Molewide map; Mollweide's projection; Mollweide's Projection; Mollwiede projection
  • s2cid=119271232 }}</ref> Projected using the Mollweide projection.

biharmonic projection      

математика

бигармоническая проекция

biharmonic function         
FUNCTION F SATISFYING Δ²F=0
Bilaplacian; Biharmonic operator; Biharmonic; Biharmonic function; Bilaplacian operator; Bi-Laplacian operator; Bi-Laplacian; Bilaplace operator; Bilaplace; Bi-Laplace operator; Bi-Laplace

математика

бигармоническая функция

biharmonic equation         
FUNCTION F SATISFYING Δ²F=0
Bilaplacian; Biharmonic operator; Biharmonic; Biharmonic function; Bilaplacian operator; Bi-Laplacian operator; Bi-Laplacian; Bilaplace operator; Bilaplace; Bi-Laplace operator; Bi-Laplace

математика

бигармоническое уравнение

Определение

azimuthal projection
[?az?'mju:?(?)l]
¦ noun a map projection in which a region of the earth is projected on to a plane tangential to the surface, usually at a pole or the equator.

Википедия

Mollweide projection

The Mollweide projection is an equal-area, pseudocylindrical map projection generally used for maps of the world or celestial sphere. It is also known as the Babinet projection, homalographic projection, homolographic projection, and elliptical projection. The projection trades accuracy of angle and shape for accuracy of proportions in area, and as such is used where that property is needed, such as maps depicting global distributions.

The projection was first published by mathematician and astronomer Karl (or Carl) Brandan Mollweide (1774–1825) of Leipzig in 1805. It was reinvented and popularized in 1857 by Jacques Babinet, who gave it the name homalographic projection. The variation homolographic arose from frequent nineteenth-century usage in star atlases.